When I was a child, my family would occasionally make a trip to the beach in Wildwood, New Jersey. My first memory of using tarot cards was with fortune tellers on the Boardwalk there. As for astrology, when I was a little girl I always had a Leo sun sign daily horoscope book on hand.

But it was the birth of my daughter in 2004 that sparked an awakening in me to the profundity of life cycles. Then, in 2006, my father died, and I had the privilege of being at his bedside as he passed. Before that time I never would have used "passed" in the context of death; for me that word was in purely church-going old folks territory. However, there is no doubt that after my father's last breath, I felt energy leaving his body and moving upward, akin to the feeling of static electricity in one's hair. Needless to say, this experience greatly hastened my journey into metaphysics. 

By 2009, I was studying astrology and tarot on my own, and by 2011, I began studying with Anne Ortelee. On March 11, 2011, the day Uranus moved into Aries after having been in Pisces for 7 years, an earthquake and tsunami caused the Fukushima nuclear accident. Although it was a tragedy, for me as an astrology student, it was also a powerful statement about how astrology works in real life.

I also studied patterns and transits in my own chart, including longer outer planet transits. For example, I had Pluto transiting my 2nd house of Value from 1999 until 2016. It would be accurate to say that Pluto ground through my 2nd house, like (if you're a New Yorker) the sound of the 6 train grinding wheels on metal tracks as it rounds the corner and pulls into Union Square station. In my case the transit was about the notion of ‘self-value’: I had been in relationship after relationship that tested my boundaries and forced me to face the limits of what I would do for others, and what I needed to value within and for myself.  And to describe what it's like after an outer planet like Pluto finishes a transit, to go back to the subway tracks grinding, it’s truly like something new has been forged. Even if you want to go back, it’s impossible. Such is life and change.

Making meaning through stories is an essential human trait. I love how astrology provides its own symbols to help develop perspective and find meaning for life changes. It also creates another avenue to communicate your experience to others.

Astrology holds you with honesty in both your strengths and weaknesses, and allows you to own all of them. Astrology is a way to increase your own strength. It can help you work with what you’re dealt, deal with multiple realities, and show you a way to move forward.

This system gives us a mirror, a very personal look at ourselves, our human view of relationship to ourselves and the other: the stars, planets, and far away places of what is visible/invisible.


Eva Jane Peck grew up in Mystic, Connecticut. Since then she has lived and raised her daughter in Brooklyn, New York. She has a B.A. in English and a minor in Art History from Barnard College, Columbia University, and an M.S.Ed. from Bank Street College of Education. She has worked as a teacher of preschool special education and early childhood social-emotional development, a hospice volunteer, an organizer for community gardens, and a typesetter for the New York Review of Books. She has studied at the Poetry Project and New School with John Godfrey and Matthew Zapruder, among others, and her poetry has appeared in a variety of online and print journals including Coconut, Fence, Ghost Proposal, Poems by Sunday, Someone Stop Me, Spine Road, and Sun's Skeleton. She is a member of the National Council for Geocosmic Research and the Organization for Professional Astrology. She has studied clowning with Sarah French and Vivian Gladwell, recorded music and toured with Appendix Out (a previous incarnation of Scottish folk musician Alasdair Roberts), and performed music with ensembles including NYC's Javanese Gamelan Kusuma Laras, and a staging of John Cage's Song Books.